Yom Kippur.

Modern Jews have abandoned blood sacrifice, and instead observe one day each year of self-examination and affliction of the soul, to atone for the sins of the past year: “Yom Kippur atones only for sins between man and G-d, not for sins against another person. To atone for sins against another person, you must first seek reconciliation with that person, righting the wrongs you committed against them if possible. That must all be done before Yom Kippur. Yom Kippur is a complete Sabbath; no work can be performed on that day. It is well-known that you are supposed to refrain from eating and drinking (even water) on Yom Kippur. It is a complete, 25-hour fast beginning before sunset on the evening before Yom Kippur and ending after nightfall on the day of Yom Kippur. The Talmud also specifies additional restrictions that are less well-known: washing and bathing, anointing one’s body (with cosmetics, deodorants, etc.), wearing leather shoes (Orthodox Jews routinely wear canvas sneakers under their dress clothes on Yom Kippur), and engaging in sexual relations are all prohibited on Yom Kippur.” “Yom Kippur,” Jewish Virtual Library

Leviticus 16:30 For on that day the priest shall make atonement for you, to cleanse you, that you may be clean from all your sins before the Lord.31 It is a sabbath of solemn rest for you, and you shall afflict your souls. It is a statute forever.32 And the priest, who is anointed and consecrated to minister as priest in his fathers place, shall make atonement, and put on the linen clothes, the holy garments;33 then he shall make atonement for the Holy Sanctuary, and he shall make atonement for the tabernacle of meeting and for the altar, and he shall make atonement for the priests and for all the people of the assembly.34 This shall be an everlasting statute for you, to make atonement for the children of Israel, for all their sins, once a year. And he did as the Lord commanded Moses.

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One Response to Yom Kippur.

  1. Mike says:

    What about Messianic Jews?

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